Skip to content
Archive of posts tagged process redesign

Survey on Process Management: People and Expertise

In a process-oriented firm, people who execute the processes need to have appropriate skills and knowledge. Furthermore, knowledge of certain process improvement, process redesign and change management techniques have to be present. This article discusses the results related to people and expertise of the process management survey. Survey details (research design, sample, etc.) can be found here.

Process performers must have appropriate knowledge of how to execute the process, otherwise they won’t be able to implement the process design (Hammer, 2007). Most of the surveyed firms state that their employees only have moderate knowledge about the design of the business process they work for. The item “Employees can describe the design of the business process they work for. They know how their work affects subsequent work, customers and process performance” was rated by the firms in the sample as follows:

  • 13,33%: Disagree
  • 51,33%: Neither agree nor disagree
  • 35,33%: Agree

The item “Our organization’s employees are skilled in problem solving, process improvement and decision-making techniques” was rated by the firms in the sample as follows:

  • 20,67%: Disagree
  • 61,33%: Neither agree nor disagree
  • 18,00%: Agree

According to Hammer (2007), a process organization must have some people skilled in, and with knowledge of, process redesign. The item “An expert cadre is available in the organization including change management, process redesign and project management experts” was rated by the firms in the sample as follows:

  • 42,67%: Disagree
  • 33,33%: Neither agree nor disagree
  • 24,00%: Agree

Improving the performance of business processes requires knowledge about, and usage of, process improvement methodologies.The item “The organization makes use of methodologies for continuous process improvement, like KAIZEN, Six Sigma, etc.” was rated by the firms in the sample as follows:

  • 32,89%: Disagree
  • 29,53%: Neither agree nor disagree
  • 37,58%: Agree
The organization makes use of methodologies for continuous process improvement, like KAIZEN, Six Sigma, etc.

The organization makes use of methodologies for continuous process improvement, like KAIZEN, Six Sigma, etc.

Business Process Reengineering

A myriad of books and articles refer to the idea of business process reengineering (BPR). The purpose of this website is not to comprehensively treat the idea of BPR, since BPR is a single project undertaken by a firm and not an approach of managing a firm based on its processes on an ongoing basis. Therefore this website should only roughly outline the concept of BPR.

Business Process Reengineering is defined by Hammer and Champy (1993) as “…the fundamental rethinking and the radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical, contemporary measures of performance, such as cost, quality, service and speed.”

BPR has a lot of different interpretations. Coulson-Thomas (1995) differentiates between two types of business process redesign. He calls the first type “process simplification” which refers to incremental improvement of processes. This approach can yield incremental improvements through documentation, analysis and then redesign of current processes. By contrast, the second type of process redesign is about the fundamental “process re-engineering” which involves radical change. Radical change means a fundamental transformation, e.g. implementing completely new processes or rebuilding the whole organization. Similarly, Childe et al. (1994) differentiate between incremental and radical types of BPR. In practice, both types of business process redesign are labeled as BPR (Armistead and Machin, 1998). In this website, the definition of Coulson-Thomas is followed, i.e. BPR is not considered to be an incremental change or improvement of a business process but a fundamental and radical redesign of business processes.